The 13 Tastiest Pancakes in Madison

We’ve ordered up heaping stacks and gotten our fingers sticky to bring you a hot-off-the-griddle lineup of the city’s tastiest flapjacks

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SAY CHEESE

SOPHIA'S CAFÉ AND BAKERY

Cottage cheese pancakes with raspberry sauce

PHOTO BY TIMOTHY HUGHES

Sophia’s has clearly mastered the tricky art of supply and demand: Given that it’s open for breakfast only on Saturdays and Sundays, it’s not uncommon to see a line of customers stretching out the door. Regulars know you may have to share your table with a stranger—heck, you may even have to eat with your plate on your lap outside. And if you’ve never been there before, chances are good you’ll do a sitcom-quality double-take when you ask Izzi Plunkett, one of the cooks who makes it all happen at Sophia’s each weekend, for a recommendation and she says, “Cottage cheese pancakes.”

Cottage cheese pancakes?

That’s a big yes. The cultured sourness of the cheese takes buttermilk’s traditional seat at the pancake table, creating a cake that’s softer, more textured and spongier than what you’ve tasted before. Topping it off with a tart raspberry sauce balances the flavors deliciously.

“We don’t make our batter sweet,” says Plunkett. “The tang of the raspberries adds a tartness and sweetness to the taste. It doesn’t matter if you don’t like cottage cheese.” It really doesn’t. 

Sophia's Cafe and Bakery
831 E. Johnson St.
259-1506

 

HEALTHY AND HEARTY

CREMA CAFÉ

Blueberry oat pancakes with toasted almonds and vanilla butter

PHOTO BY MARTHA BUSSE

At the very edge of the Lake Edge Shopping Center on Monona Drive, you’ll find some of the tastiest pancakes on the east side. What you won’t find, believe it or not, is buttermilk.

“We’ve never done a buttermilk pancake—where can’t you find that?” asks Dave Dorst, the happy and outgoing kitchen manager. Crema opts instead for rolled oats, ground right on the premises and mixed with flour into a thick, hearty batter. 

It works beautifully and tastes divine: Toasted almonds dust the pancakes, which are then covered with powdered sugar while the vanilla butter provides a warm and gentle under-taste. The syrup’s indigenous, too, from Marquardt’s Tree Farm. “We’re trying to keep it as local as we can,” says Dorst.

Between the blueberry oat cakes and the weekend special pancakes—cornmeal, wheat and flax, anyone?—Dorst has become quite the expert. 

“I used to be super intimidated about making the batter,” he admits. “Now I’m the pancake guy.” After a couple bites of this plate, you likely will be, too.  

Crema Cafe
4124 Monona Dr.
224-1150

 

TASTES OF THE PAST

MANNA CAFÉ

Collins House oat pancakes

PHOTO BY NICOLE PEASLEE

A ton of history is tucked into the pancake batter the Manna Café on Sherman Avenue serves. As the locals know, it’s the same recipe that patrons savored at the former Collins House Bed and Breakfast on Gorham for just under thirty years. And plenty of the people who tried it then and there are happy to come back and track it down here and now.  

“It’s one of the things that brings people to us,” admits front team manager Sean Langenecker. “It’s neat to be part of the food culture in Madison and part of people’s lives. It’s fun to hear their stories.”

Some customers mix in chocolate chips, bananas or peanut butter, while others thicken the mix with granola, but these cakes are actually great straight. Hearty and fluffy, they taste a little like eating a sugar cookie on the plate, with the oats evident to both your eyes and your tongue. Garnished with real Wisconsin maple syrup (“We will never serve any other,” says Langenecker), it’s a sweet plate of breakfast heaven.

Want more proof? The Collins House cakes even convinced Langenecker: “I’m not a pancake eater, but I’ll eat these. We will never not serve them.”

Manna Cafe
611 N. Sherman Ave.
663-5500

 

STRIKING GOLD

THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE

The 49er

PHOTO BY SHARON VANORNY

As the name implies, The Original Pancake House is the first place a lot of Madisonians think of when it’s time to enjoy a comfortable stack. Chalk it up to the house’s friendly, diner-esque vibe, where every staffer seems to know your name, and pancakes like the 49er, a popular second to the restaurant’s own apple pancake.

Camped somewhere between a crêpe and a pancake, the 49er, a thin and tasty cake that uses the same batter as Swedish pancakes, is one of the most popular menu options. The cake gets its name, of course, from the west-coast gold rush, not because of the size of its diameter, although given the way it spans your plate, you’d be forgiven for thinking so. 

“They’re a little more chewy,” explains manager Drew Fleming, who started with the House as a chef twenty-three years ago, back when it was located by Hilldale Mall. “It’s a very different texture—it melts in your mouth.” He’s got that right. Can we have another?

Original Pancake House
5518 University Ave.
231-3666

 

SEEING RED

BLUEPHIES

Red velvet pancakes

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOOD FIGHT

You’ve probably heard—and maybe even lived—the adage about pancakes being the equivalent of having dessert for breakfast. But you’ll never truly understand what that means until you’ve come fork to tastebud with the amazing red velvet pancakes on Bluephies’ weekend-only brunch menu.     

For starters, it’s one of the most visually arresting breakfast plates you’ve ever seen: a gleaming stack of red-tinted pancakes topped by a smattering of raindrop-sized chocolate chips and succulent cream cheese frosting, er, butter. Truly, this may be the first plate of pancakes to make syrup utterly irrelevant.

“Normally, pancakes are light and fluffy,” says Bill Horzuesky, who co-owns and operates Bluephies with his wife, Melanie. “We wanted a variation on that.”

They found it, and then some, creating one of several tasty breakfast dishes that cleverly mirror the desserts served in the case at the front of the restaurant.

Originally the pancakes were supposed to be waffles, but Horzuesky found that waffles took too much time for his staff to prepare, slowing down the restaurant’s well-oiled brunch mechanics. Since pancakes are the only breakfast food Horzuesky eats, it was an easy switch—and we’re all the beneficiaries.

Bluephies
2701 Monroe St.
231-3663

 

BIG EATS

MICKIES DAIRY BAR

Chocolate chip pancakes

PHOTO BY TIMOTHY HUGHES

You know what you’re in for when you eke your way through the door of Mickies Dairy Bar, especially if it’s on a weekend. Even more especially if it’s on a Badger game day weekend. The Formica booth tabletops, the ’50s-era menus that still cover the walls. And the sea of red-clad customers, all clamoring for a seat.

And Mickies’ pancakes are an integral part of that mix. Go ahead, pick your size-centric metaphor to describe what’s eclipsing every inch of your plate: A manhole cover. The world’s biggest Frisbee. Captain America’s shield. You could opt for one of the unusual options scrawled on the main wall—cornmeal or banana cinnamon pancakes—but it’s awfully hard to say no to a full order of chocolate chip pancakes, a pair of thick cakes that scarcely need syrup to stand on their own. Just be prepared to enjoy the sizable goodness quickly—it’s a sure bet that several someones are waiting for your seat. 

Mickies Dairy Bar
1511 Monroe St.
256-9476

 

STATE STREET TREAT

THE SUNROOM CAFÉ

Wheat pancakes with bananas

PHOTO BY BRIDGET GEYGAN

For the last three-plus decades, students, professors and State Street visitors have been able to climb the stairs to the cozy Sunroom Café, there to sit down with a tidy plate of wheat pancakes. They have no idea what owner Mark Paradise had to do to make the cakes possible: Back in the beginning, he had to reconfigure the space’s entire exhaust system to accommodate raging customer demand, after the four-foot griddle he’d originally purchased proved woefully inadequate to the task.

Today, pancakes are still a popular choice, and it doesn’t take much to wean customers away from the basic buttermilk. “They try the wheat pancakes, and they go with that,” says Paradise.

Chocolate chip is a popular and tasty topping option here, as are bananas, with oversized slices that nest neatly in the cake, adding a nice texture. If your taste is wilder, no worries: Sunroom’s staff prides itself on handling special orders—if it’s in the house, the staff is generally willing to mix it in with the pancakes. Just don’t try to pack in too much.

Sunroom Cafe
638 State St.
255-1555

 

Aaron R. Conklin is a Madison-based writer.

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